Statutory holiday criteria by province | Wagepoint

Statutory holiday criteria by province

Employee eligibility criteria to receive statutory holiday pay varies by province.

Alberta

  • Worked their last scheduled shift before and first scheduled shift after the holiday (unless consent is obtained from employer to take either shift off)
  • Worked on the holiday if asked

British Columbia

  • Employed at least 30 days
  • Worked or earned wages on at least 15 of the 30 days before the statutory holiday (unless under an averaging agreement or variance at any time in the 30 days before the holiday)

Manitoba

  • Worked last scheduled work day before and first scheduled work day after the holiday unless absence is due to illness or with consent of employer
  • Has not refused to work on the holiday falling on a regular work day if expected to work

New Brunswick

  • Employed at least 90 calendar days in the 12 calendar months before the holiday (unless returning from an employer-approved leave)
  • Worked scheduled regular day of work both before and after the holiday unless there is a good reason for not doing so
  • Worked the scheduled shift after agreeing to work the holiday unless there is a good reason for not doing so
  • Not be employed under an arrangement in which employees can decide when to work or when not to work

Newfoundland

  • Actively employed at least 30 calendar days before the holiday
  • Worked the scheduled shift both before and after the holiday

Northwest Territories

  • Worked 30 days in the last 12 months
  • Reported to work on the holiday after being requested to do so
  • Worked regular scheduled work day before and after the holiday unless absence was with employer’s consent
  • An employee is entitled to be paid holiday pay while on
      1. bereavement leave;

      2. sick leave; or

      3. court leave not exceeding 10 days

  • An employee is not entitled to be paid holiday pay while on
      1. pregnancy leave;

      2. parental leave;

      3. compassionate leave; or

      4. court leave exceeding 10 days

Nova Scotia

  • Earned wages on at least 15 of the 30 calendar days before the holiday (for example, paid sick or education leave would qualify)
  • Worked the last scheduled shift before the holiday and the first scheduled shift after the holiday (this does not apply if the employee is told not to report for one of these periods)

Ontario

  • Worked their full regularly scheduled day/shift before and their full regularly scheduled day/shift after the holiday
  • Did not fail, without reasonable cause, to work their entire shift on the holiday if they agreed to or were required to work that day

Prince Edward Island

  • Employed for 30 calendar days before the holiday
  • Earned wages on at least 15 of the 30 calendar days before the holiday
  • Worked the scheduled shifts before and after the holiday unless advised not to work by employer

Quebec

  • Was not absent without valid cause or employer consent on the employee’s working day before or after the holiday (not required for the june 24 National Holiday; however, employee must not be absent without valid reason if required to work on june 24 and must be employed on the National Holiday)

Saskatchewan – No conditions specified

Yukon

  • Employed for at least 30 calendar days before the holiday
  • Reported to work when scheduled to do so on holiday
  • Worked regular schedule before and after the holiday
  • Not on an unpaid leave in 14 days preceding the holiday

Source: Statutory Holidays Payroll Best Practice Guidelines. The Canadian Payroll Association. February 2018.